25% off all member book orders

WOMEN IN TRANSLATION MONTH

Posted on August 06 2018

To celebrate Women in Translation Month (#WITmonth) we're reducing the price of translation membership to only £65! Translation Membership is the perfect way to keep up to date with the latest translated poetry across a wide range of publishers! Every quarter our expert Selector, George Szirtes, chooses the best new poetry in translation book to deliver straight to your door, alongside our Bulletin magazine, full of reviews and exclusive commentary from major poets. We're also introducing two NEW translation membership options Translation Full and Translation Charter for those wishing to receive all the benefits of Full or Charter membership PLUS the Translation Choice every quarter. Members also get 25% off all additional book orders through the PBS.

Why not get into the spirit of #WITMonth and read your way around the world with a few of our favourite women in translation poetry titles! Here are our top 5 Women In Translation poets to get you started...

TOP 5 PBS WOMEN IN TRANSLATION TITLES

1. Luljeta LLeshanaku - Negative Space - translated by Ani Gjika (Bloodaxe)

Albania’s Luljeta Lleshanaku grew up in negative space, living under family house arrest during the years of Enver Hoxha’s autocratic communist rule. Her recent poems are a response to what was missing then, not only in her life but for her whole generation, evoking absences, emptiness – what was unseen, unspoken or undone – through the concept of negative space. The space around objects, not the objects themselves, becomes the real, most significant part of an image, bringing balance to the whole of a composition, so enabling Lleshanaku to look back at the reality of her Albanian past and give voice to those who could not speak for themselves.

2. Ana Blandiana - The Sun of Hereafter - Ebb of the Senses (Bloodaxe) - Translated by Paul Scott Derrick and Viorica Patea

Ana Blandiana is one of Romania’s foremost poets, a leading dissident before the fall of Communism, and now her country’s strongest candidate for the Nobel Prize. A prominent opponent of the Ceausescu regime, Blandiana became known for her daring, outspoken poems as well as for her courageous defence of ethical values. Over the years, her works have become the symbol of an ethical consciousness that refuses to be silenced by a totalitarian government.

3. Evelyn Schlag - All Under One Roof - Translated by Karen Leeder (Carcanet)

The Austrian poet and novelist Evelyn Schlag returns with All Under One Roof, a wide-ranging selection from her radical recent work, with an essay which discusses frankly the sources, politics and strategies of her writing.  'Evelyn Schlag's poems have a kind of discreet presence; once spoken they have claimed their permanent place in the lyric cosmos'. Leeder's English selection traces a uniquely Austrian imagination at the heart of contemporary European poetry.

4. After Russia - Marina Tsvetaeva - (Shearsman)

After Russia is considered to mark the high point in Marina Tsvetaeva’s output of shorter, lyrical poems. Tsvetaeva told Boris Pasternak that all that mattered in the book was its anguish. Breathtaking technical mastery and experimentation are underpinned by suicidal thoughts, a sense of exclusion from the circle of human love and companionship, and an increasing alienation from life itself.

5. Thick of It - Ulrike Almut Sandig - translated by Karen Leeder (Seagull Books)

The poems of German poet Ulrike Almut Sandig are at once simple and fantastic. This new collection finds her on her way to imaginary territories to navigate a “thicket” that is at once the world, the psyche, and language.

Follow the links above to order your copies with 25% off or check out more on our Translation Bookshelf

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