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T.S. Eliot Prize Shortlist

Posted on January 11 2017

The T.S. Eliot Prize for Poetry has been running since 1993 in honour of T.S. Eliot's memory. This unique and highly sought after prize is awarded annually to the writer of the best new poetry collection published in the UK and Ireland. The winner of the prize receives £20,000 and the shortlisted poets receive £1500 each.

The Judges, Ruth Padel, Julia Copus and Alan Gillis received 138 submissions from publishers and their shortlist is below. PBS Members can order all the T.S. Eliot shortlisted books with 25% off by simply following the links:

Void Studies by Rachael Boast published by Picador – ‘A sensual, sensory joy. Like music, it has a simultaneity of effect and presents memory and desire with intoxicating immediacy and authenticity.’

Measures of Expatriation by Vahni Capildeo published by Carcanet – ‘Ultimately, Measures of Expatriation offers the poet a chance to disburden herself of a “home” country.’

The Blind Road-Maker by Ian Duhig published by Picador ­– ‘A generous, smart and big-hearted book of poems, from a writer who truly values the whole of life as it is variously lived.’

Interference Pattern by J O Morgan, Published by Cape Poetry – ‘Requires and rewards repeated attention.’

The Seasons of Cullen Church by Bernard O’Donoghue, published by Faber – ‘As with everything O’Donoghue writes, the more you look, the more you see.’

Falling Awake by Alice Oswald, published by Cape Poetry – ‘…words for encounters with nature that ordinarily defy language.’

Jackself by Jacob Polley, published by Picador – ‘The fourth collection from one of Britain's finest poets.’

Say Something Back by Denise Riley, published by Picador – ‘It is impossible not to want to “say something back” to each of her poems in recognition of their outstanding quality.’

Every Little Sound by Ruby Robinson, published by Liverpool University Press –  ‘…a declaration that even the most broken of us has the potential to thrive.’

The Remedies - Katharine Towers, published by Picador –  ‘[Towers] manages the balancing act between entertainment and something that comes close to a prayer.’

 

The results will be announced at 7pm on Sunday 15 January 2017 in Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall. Tickets available here.

Guest blogpost by Poppy Jarratt. 

Image from The T. S. Eliot Prize website. 

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