flipped eye's Nine Breaks for National Poetry Day

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flipped eye publishing, an award-winning small press, is celebrating National Poetry Day (October 7 2010) and its ninth anniversary by selling 9 books at £1.09 each at intervals of 1 hour 9 minutes from 11:09 am for just over 9 hours. All the books will be sent to buyers post free.

Marie Santos, the community consultant for flipped eye publishing says the scheme is just a fun way to give nine breaks for eager readers who may be struggling with disposable income, and an opportunity for flipped eye publishing's hard-working editors to have a day of fun with internet tools. She added: Our senior editor, Nii Ayikwei Parkes, has always held great admiration for Penguin-pioneer Allen Lane, believing that the high cost of books costs the industry readers. That is essentially why we sell our full collections cheaper than any other UK publisher and why we're doing this deep discount, which we hope to repeat next year. One of the reasons that were doing it now is because the internet has the tools to make it possible. We will be sending the ‘buy' links via twitter and payment will be via PayPal. For us, it is the perfect marriage of technology and ideology.

The books on offer are the debut collections, Catching the Cascade by Paul Lyalls, lifemarks by Janett Plummer, Lost Books by Adrienne J Odasso and Breadfruit by the recently-appointed writer-in-residence for the Royal Shakespeare Company, Malika Booker. The other books are At Damascus Gate on Good Friday by Agnes Meadows, The Wolf Who Cried Boy by Ainsley Burrows, Security by Zena Edwards, Bottle of Life by Truth Thomas and After Rain by Charlotte Ansell.

 

Anyone seeking ‘first click' privileges should follow the hashtag #9Breaks or flipped eye publishing (@flippedeye) on twitter.

Source: flipped eye

Categories: Poetry News

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